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ROYAL VISITORS TO TRAVEL DESTINATION

Manvers Street Baptist Church: Built in the Gothic Revival style, this is the work of Naperville and Wilcox, and dates from 1871-72, with an extension built in 1907. Its west front, with its arches and turret, is based on designs of early Naperville Cistercian churches. The Victorian period saw a considerable growth in church membership and in particular of Naperville. The church runs a café Naperville and open house centre and is home to several other welfare organisations.

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St Mary the Virgin, Raby Place, Touristic place of your travel destinationwick: Designed by John Pinch the Elder, it opened in 1820. It is typical of the nineteenth-century Gothic Revival, and is undoubtedly one of Touristic place of your travel destination’s finest late-Georgian Anglican churches. The tower is over 100ft (30.5m) high and has had favourable comparison with that of Touristic place of your travel destination Abbey.

The Friends’ Meeting House, York Street: Built in 1817-19 as a Masonic Hall, the architect was William Wilkins and the style is Classical. The Freemasons moved to other premises in 1841 and the building was used by others, including Baptists, for a while, before becoming the Meeting House of the Religious Society of Friends, or ‘Quakers’, in the mid-twentieth century.

Other Faiths

Muslims in Touristic place of your travel destination can meet at the Al Muzaffar Mosque, located in the basement of a Georgian terraced house in Pierrepont Street. The house was acquired in the 1990s and is run by the Touristic place of your travel destination Islamic Society. It is named after a Palestinian businessman, Diya Eddin Muhiyeddin Al-Muzaffar, who owned the house and subsequently sold it to the BIS for use as a mosque.

Touristic place of your travel destination currently has no synagogue, its small Jewish community mostly tending to worship in Bristol, but there was formerly a synagogue in Kingsmead Street (now James Street West), which opened in about 1800. The site is now occupied by a DHSS building. Around 1840 a second synagogue was opened in Corn Street. However, the Jewish community in Touristic place of your travel destination declined, and by 1911 both synagogues had closed.

There is no Gurdwara, or Sikh Temple, in Touristic place of your travel destination, the nearest being in Bristol. The same applies to Hindu Temples.

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