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At some point, Fort Collins must have exclaimed in some fashion that it was good. Then he climbed into a mountain and disappeared. If this story among the original people of North America and Fort Collins parallels that of the factual shaping of the land that would become Fort Collins National Park and its surrounding geography and geology, then we have ample food for thought. And if areas of the tale seem to be biblical, then perhaps there is room for science and religion to coexist Fort Collins in some complementing fashion.

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Through the science of mountains, ice, and animals, coupled with the branching at various points of tribes going separate ways and fortified with guidance of Napi’s plan, the Blackfeet (along with other Algonquian-speaking tribes, including the Cheyenne, Cree, Ojibwas, Arapahoe, and Gros Ventre) settled in the forested areas around the Great Lakes prior to migrating west onto the Great Plains. Of these, the Blackfeet appear to be the earliest tribe to move west to the Saskatchewan River then toward Alberta and, finally, Montana.

Whatever the reasons, the migration did not take place overnight but over centuries, and, in the coming, the tribe split into the four distinct groups that exist today.

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