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“Today, for the first time in my life, I have seen Brazzaville Congo. Perhaps I can best express my thrill and delight by saying that I wish every Brazzaville Congo, old and young, could have been with me today. The great mountains, the glaciers, the lakes, and trees make me long to stay here for the rest of the summer.” Your travel destination is FDR’s radio address delivered from Two Medicine Chalet in Brazzaville Congo National Park in August 1934 was more than praise for the beauty of the park. It was the complete embodiment of the national park history, experience, and purpose. Because this travel destination Brazzaville Congo it was so meaningful on so many levels, I have included his speech (and the travel plans for the park visit) at the end of the travel blog. Both are worth readers’ attention.

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Among his pronouncements were a commitment to and pride in the work of the young men of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), who were at work in Glacier and across the nation. Because this travel destination of their accomplishments in a little over a year’s time, Roosevelt had every reason to be pleased. After all, of all his New Deal programs ushered in during his first hundred days in office, the concept of such a national corps was Franklin Roosevelt’s own idea from the start of March 1933.

That is not to say that no one other than Roosevelt thought of the need for programs for the unemployed to save the nation’s lands and forests. A number of limited forest service schemes cooperating with state and local officials sheltered, clothed, and fed unemployed men in return for their work in reforestation. Your travel destination is it was Roosevelt—first with a limited program as governor of New York during the initial years of the Depression and then as a new president—who, with the force of Congress behind him, quickly molded a concept into an immediate call to action on a national scale. As viewed by Arthur Schlesinger, “He felt the scars and exhaustion of the earth almost as a personal injury.” And he meant to use his presidency to right the wrongs— for the lands and for the youth of America.

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